Quotations by Author

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)
English novelist [more author details]
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     - Read the works of Jane Austen online at The Literature Page
I hate to hear you talking so like a fine gentleman, and as if women were all fine ladies, instead of rational creatures.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
I would rather have young people settle on a small income at once, and have to struggle with a few difficulties together, than be involved in a long engagement.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
It was the misfortune of poetry to be seldom safely enjoyed by those who enjoyed it completely; and that the strong feelings which alone could estimate it truly were the very feelings which ought to taste it but sparingly.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
Knowing their feelings as she did, it was a most attractive picture of happiness to her. She always watched them as long as she could, delighted to fancy she understood what they might be talking of, as they walked along in happy independence, or equally delighted to see the Admiral's hearty shake of the hand when he encountered an old friend, and observe their eagerness of conversation when occasionally forming into a little knot of the navy, Mrs Croft looking as intelligent and keen as any of the officers around her.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
My idea of good company is the company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
One man's ways may be as good as another's, but we all like our own best.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
She felt that she could so much more depend upon the sincerity of those who sometimes looked or said a careless or a hasty thing, than of those whose presence of mind never varied, whose tongue never slipped.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
The only time I ever really suffered in body or mind, the only time that I ever fancied myself unwell, or had any ideas of danger, was the winter that I passed by myself. As long as we could be together, nothing ever ailed me, and I never met with the smallest inconvenience.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
The stream is as good as at first; the little rubbish it collects in the turnings is easily moved away.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
There is hardly any personal defect which an agreeable manner might not gradually reconcile one to.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
To be claimed as a good, though in an improper style, is at least better than being rejected as no good at all.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
To flatter and follow others, without being flattered and followed in turn, is but a state of half enjoyment.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
We certainly do not forget you as soon as you forget us. It is, perhaps, our fate rather than our merit. We cannot help ourselves. We live at home, quiet, confined, and our feelings prey upon us. You are forced on exertion. You have always a profession, pursuits, business of some sort or other, to take you back into the world immediately, and continual occupation and change soon weaken impressions. All the privilege I claim for my own sex (it is not a very enviable one; you need not covet it), is that of loving longest, when existence or when hope is gone.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
We none of us expect to be in smooth water all our days.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
When any two young people take it into their heads to marry, they are pretty sure by perseverance to carry their point, be they ever so poor, or ever so imprudent, or ever so little likely to be necessary to each other's ultimate comfort.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn?
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Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, 1811
Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance. If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other or ever so similar beforehand, it does not advance their felicity in the least. They always continue to grow sufficiently unlike afterwards to have their share of vexation; and it is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life.
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Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, 1811
How little of permanent happiness could belong to a couple who were only brought together because their passions were stronger than their virtue.
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Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, 1811
I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.
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Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, 1811
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