Quotations by Subject

Quotations by Subject: Love
(Related Subjects: Sex, Marriage, Friendship, Charity)
Showing quotations 31 to 60 of 161 quotations in our collections
We can only learn to love by loving.
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Iris Murdoch (1919 - 1999), O Magazine, February 2004
When you have seen as much of life as I have, you will not underestimate the power of obsessive love.
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J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, 2005
But when a young lady is to be a heroine, the perverseness of forty surrounding families cannot prevent her. Something must and will happen to throw a hero in her way.
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Jane Austen (1775 - 1817), Northanger Abbey
Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love.
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Jane Austen (1775 - 1817), Northanger Abbey
I cannot think well of a man who sports with any woman's feelings; and there may often be a great deal more suffered than a stander-by can judge of.
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Jane Austen (1775 - 1817), Mansfield Park
I pay very little regard...to what any young person says on the subject of marriage. If they profess a disinclination for it, I only set it down that they have not yet seen the right person.
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Jane Austen (1775 - 1817), Mansfield Park
The enthusiasm of a woman's love is even beyond the biographer's.
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Jane Austen (1775 - 1817), Mansfield Park
The more I know of the world, the more am I convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!
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Jane Austen (1775 - 1817), Sense and Sensibility, 1811
We certainly do not forget you as soon as you forget us. It is, perhaps, our fate rather than our merit. We cannot help ourselves. We live at home, quiet, confined, and our feelings prey upon us. You are forced on exertion. You have always a profession, pursuits, business of some sort or other, to take you back into the world immediately, and continual occupation and change soon weaken impressions. All the privilege I claim for my own sex (it is not a very enviable one; you need not covet it), is that of loving longest, when existence or when hope is gone.
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Jane Austen (1775 - 1817), Persuasion, 1818
Love is, above all else, the gift of oneself.
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Jean Anouilh (1910 - 1987)
Age does not protect you from love. But love, to some extent, protects you from age.
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Jeanne Moreau
Is love supposed to last throughout all time, or is it like trains changing at random stops. If I loved her, how could I leave her? If I felt that way then, how come I don't feel anything now?
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Jeff Melvoin, Northern Exposure, Altered Egos, 1993
What is it about possessing things? Why do we feel the need to own what we love, and why do we become jerks when we do? We've all been there-- you want something, to possess it. By possessing something you lose it. You finally win the girl of your dreams, the first thing you do is change her. The little things she does with her hair, the way she wears her clothes or the way she chews her gum. Pretty soon what you like, what you changed, what you don't like, blends together like a watercolor in the rain.
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Jeff Melvoin, Northern Exposure, Dateline: Cicely, 1992
True love brings up everything - you're allowing a mirror to be held up to you daily.
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Jennifer Aniston, O Magazine, February 2004
'Light fuse and get away' may work for a Roman candle, but not so much for the wrath of a woman scorned.
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Jeph Jacques, Questionable Content webcomic, #678, 08-02-06
A good relationship is like fireworks: loud, explosive, and liable to maim you if you hold on too long.
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Jeph Jacques, Questionable Content, 11-14-08
Love is the delightful interval between meeting a beautiful girl and discovering that she looks like a haddock.
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John Barrymore (1882 - 1942)
Breaking up isnít something that gets done to you; itís something that happens with you.
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John Green, An Abundance of Katherines, 2008
Iím in love with you, and I know that love is just a shout into the void, and that oblivion is inevitable, and that weíre all doomed and that there will come a day when all our labor has been returned to dust, and I know the sun will swallow the only earth weíll ever have, and I am in love with you.
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John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, 2012
Thatís who you really like. The people you can think out loud in front of.
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John Green, An Abundance of Katherines, 2008
The best way to get people to like you is not to like them too much.
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John Green, An Abundance of Katherines, 2008
Thereís some people in this world who you can just love and love and love no matter what.
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John Green, An Abundance of Katherines, 2008
When you're a teenager and you're in love, it's obvious to everyone but you and the person you're in love with.
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John Scalzi, Old Man's War, 2005
'Tis the most tender part of love, each other to forgive.
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John Sheffield
Gravity. It keeps you rooted to the ground. In space, there's not any gravity. You just kind of leave your feet and go floating around. Is that what being in love is like?
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Josh Brand and John Falsey, Northern Exposure, The Pilot, 1990
How we treasure (and admire) the people who acknowledge us!
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Julie Morgenstern, O Magazine, Belatedly Yours, January 2004
To love is to receive a glimpse of heaven.
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Karen Sunde
Passion is seldom the end of any story, for it cannot long endure if it is not soon supplemented with true affection and mutual respect.
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Kathryn L. Nelson, Pemberley Manor, 2006
She makes me love her and I like people who make me love them. It saves me so much trouble in making myself love them.
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L. M. Montgomery (1874 - 1942), Anne of Green Gables, 1908
There is no use in loving things if you have to be torn from them, is there? And it's so hard to keep from loving things, isn't it?
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L. M. Montgomery (1874 - 1942), Anne of Green Gables, 1908
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Showing quotations 31 to 60 of 161 quotations in our collections
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