Quotations by Author

Oscar Wilde (1854 - 1900)
Irish dramatist, novelist, & poet [more author details]
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     - Read the works of Oscar Wilde online at The Literature Page
Scandal is gossip made tedious by morality.
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Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan, 1892, Act III
We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.
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Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan, 1892, Act III
What is a cynic? A man who knows the price of everything and the value of nothing.
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Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan, 1892, Act III
Only the shallow know themselves.
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Oscar Wilde, Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young, 1882
Vile deeds like poison weeds bloom well in prison air, it is only what is good in man, that wastes and withers there.
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Oscar Wilde, The Ballad of Reading Gaol
We have really everything in common with America nowadays except, of course, language.
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Oscar Wilde, The Canterville Ghost, 1882
To give an accurate description of what has never occurred is not merely the proper occupation of the historian, but the inalienable privilege of any man of parts and culture.
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Oscar Wilde, The Critic as Artist
But what is the difference between literature and journalism?
...Journalism is unreadable and literature is not read. That is all.
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Oscar Wilde, The Critic as Artist, 1891
It is only an auctioneer who can equally and impartially admire all schools of art.
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Oscar Wilde, The Critic as Artist, 1891
The public is wonderfully tolerant. It forgives everything except genius.
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Oscar Wilde, The Critic as Artist, 1891
A little sincerity is a dangerous thing, and a great deal of it is absolutely fatal.
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Oscar Wilde, The Critic as Artist, part 2, 1891
One is tempted to define man as a rational animal who always loses his temper when he is called upon to act in accordance with the dictates of reason.
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Oscar Wilde, The Critic as Artist, part 2, 1891
Do not speak ill of society, Algie. Only people who can't get in do that.
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Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest
The truth is rarely pure and never simple.
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Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest, 1895, Act I
To lose one parent, Mr Worthing, may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness.
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Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest, 1895, Act I
Thirty-five is a very attractive age. London society is full of women of the very highest birth who have, of their own free choice, remained thirty-five for years.
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Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest, Act 3
It is better to have a permanent income than to be fascinating.
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Oscar Wilde, The Model Millionaire, 1912
A man cannot be too careful in the choice of his enemies.
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Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray, 1891
Children begin by loving their parents; as they grow older they judge them; sometimes they forgive them.
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Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray, 1891
I adore simple pleasures. They are the last refuge of the complex.
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Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray, 1891
Showing quotations 61 to 80 of 103 total.
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