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Results of search for Author: Joseph Addison - Page 1 of 2
Showing results 1 to 10 of 19 total quotations found.
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Results from Cole's Quotables:

Sweet are the slumbers of the virtuous man.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719), Cato
Friendship improves happiness, and abates misery, by doubling our joys, and dividing our grief.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)
Ridicule is generally made use of to laugh men out of virtue and good sense, by attacking everything praiseworthy in human life.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)
If you wish to succeed in life, make perseverance your bosom friend, experience your wise counselor, caution your elder brother, and hope your guardian genius.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Results from Rand Lindsly's Quotations:

Laughter, while it lasts, slackens and unbraces the mind, weakens the faculties, and causes a kind of remissness and dissolution in all the powers of the soul.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Results from Poor Man's College:

I think I may define taste to be that faculty of the soul which discerns the beauties of an author with pleasure, and the imperfections with dislike.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)
To be exempt from the passions with which others are tormented, is the only pleasing solitude.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)
From social intercourse are derived some of the highest enjoyments of life; where there is a free interchange of sentiments the mind acquires new ideas, and by frequent exercise of its powers, the understanding gains fresh vigor.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)
Laughter, while it lasts, slackens and unbraces the mind, weakens the faculties and causes a kind of remissness and dissolution in all the powers of the soul; and thus it may be looked on as weakness in the composition of human nature. But if we consider the frequent reliefs we receive from it and how often it breaks the gloom which is apt to depress the mind and damp our spirits, with transient, unexpected gleams of joy, one would take care not to grow too wise for so great a pleasure of life.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)
The friendships of the world are oft confederacies in vice, or leagues of pleasures.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)
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Results of search for Author: Joseph Addison - Page 1 of 2
Showing results 1 to 10 of 19 total quotations found.

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